LTU President’s Symposium to tackle how electric vehicles will reshape urban planning

SOUTHFIELD—How will transportation’s electric future affect urban planning? Lawrence Technological University’s 8th Annual President’s Symposium intends to provide some of the answers.

The symposium, with the theme “How Electric Vehicles Will Reshape Urban Planning,” will take place Tuesday, Oct. 15 at 7 p.m. in the Mary E. Marburger Science and Engineering Auditorium, Room S100 of LTU’s Science Building (building 7 at www.ltu.edu/map). The event is free and open to the public, and free parking is available in Lots C, D and E.

The panel discussion will be moderated by Elaine Buckberg, chief economist at General Motors. Panelists are to include Mike Ableson, vice president of electric vehicle charging and infrastructure at GM; Sarah Barbo, director of corporate strategy at Consumers Energy; and Mark de la Vergne, chief of mobility innovation for the city of Detroit.

To register for this event, visit https://apply.ltu.edu/register/?id=ff6dd49d-2f9f-4bc5-a9b9-595ffc6e787c.

This year’s President’s Symposium is sponsored by the LTU College of Business and Information Technology.

LTU President Virinder Moudgil founded the annual symposium in 2012 to provide a multi-disciplinary approach to major challenges facing the Metro Detroit region. “The big challenge of the next few decades will be to find ways to harness technology to deal with the various challenges facing our society. Transportation is one of the top priorities, especially here in Michigan,” Moudgil said.

Lawrence Technological University, www.ltu.edu, is a private university founded in 1932 that offers more than 100 programs through the doctoral level in its Colleges of Architecture and Design, Arts and Sciences, Business and Information Technology, and Engineering. PayScale lists Lawrence Tech among the nation’s top 15 percent of universities for the salaries of its graduates, and U.S. News and World Report lists it in the top tier of best Midwestern universities. Students benefit from small class sizes and a real-world, hands-on, “theory and practice” education with an emphasis on leadership. Activities on Lawrence Tech’s 107-acre campus include more than 60 student organizations and NAIA varsity sports.

(Image above courtesy Korbitr via Wikimedia Commons.)

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